CNAY Founder Senator Byron Dorgan (ret.) hosted a youth panel discussion in Washington DC. Chrissie Castro, Vice Chairwoman of the Los Angeles City-County Native American Indian Commission also joined the youth panel discussion (second from right.) Native youth panelists included Kayleigh Warren, Co-Chairwoman of the Santa Clara Pueblo Youth Tribal Council (third from left); Anthony Tamez, Co-President of Chi-Nations Youth Council (fourth from left); and Samuel Schimmel, 2017 CNAY Champion for Change and CNAY Executive Director Erik Stegman (far right) was also a co-moderator.

Facebook live-stream screen capture

CNAY Founder Senator Byron Dorgan (ret.) hosted a youth panel discussion in Washington DC. Chrissie Castro, Vice Chairwoman of the Los Angeles City-County Native American Indian Commission also joined the youth panel discussion (second from right.) Native youth panelists included Kayleigh Warren, Co-Chairwoman of the Santa Clara Pueblo Youth Tribal Council (third from left); Anthony Tamez, Co-President of Chi-Nations Youth Council (fourth from left); and Samuel Schimmel, 2017 CNAY Champion for Change and CNAY Executive Director Erik Stegman (far right) was also a co-moderator.

Center For Native American Youth Releases 2nd Annual ‘State of Native Youth’ Report

CNAY's State of Native Youth report celebrates Native American Heritage Month with a panel event in Washington, DC.

On November 15th, the Center for Native American Youth at The Aspen Institute (CNAY) released its second annual State of Native Youth report and also celebrated Native American Heritage Month with a panel event in Washington, DC.

Native youth panelists included Kayleigh Warren, Co-Chairwoman of the Santa Clara Pueblo Youth Tribal Council; Anthony Tamez, Co-President of Chi-Nations Youth Council; and Samuel Schimmel, 2017 CNAY Champion for Change.

“As a Native youth you should be strong in your values and doing what you should in support of your people,” said Native youth panelist Kayleigh Warren. Warren said she was also empowered by the strength of her culture in the face of any struggle. “My love for my people is stronger than anyone’s hate.”

Anthony Tamez stated he was proud to be Native and Black, yet sometimes faced pre-conceived stereotypes. “I am Native and Black, so that is who I am. But the idea of what Natives look like can be connected to things like the mascot issue. People tell me I don’t look like how people see Indians.”

Samuel Schimmel shared that he also battled with stereotypes, referencing a time when he told his teacher that not all Indians lived in tipi’s and all Eskimos did not live in igloo’s. The statement got him suspended from school.

Chrissie Castro, Vice Chairwoman of the Los Angeles City-County Native American Indian Commission also joined the youth panel discussion alongside CNAY Founder Senator Byron Dorgan (ret.) and CNAY Executive Director Erik Stegman.

They discussed the State of Native Youth report, put out for the second year by the Center for Native American Youth.

On November 15th, the Center for Native American Youth at The Aspen Institute (CNAY) released its second annual State of Native Youth report. The report is now available online.

Courtesy CNAY

On November 15th, the Center for Native American Youth at The Aspen Institute (CNAY) released its second annual State of Native Youth report. The report is now available online.

“Our State of Native Youth report combines survey data, research, program highlights, and the stories of Native youth to give us a clear picture of the resources our young people need,” said Stegman in a release. “We strive to make this report a platform and road-map for building opportunity for Native youth across the country.”

Each year, the State of Native Youth report highlights priorities shared by Native youth in round-table meetings with CNAY and through virtual participation in the Gen-I Online Round-table Survey.

This year, survey participants identified culture and language, education, and employment as their top three priorities. In addition to sharing these findings, the report examines data indicators of Native youth success, as well as the policies that impact their lives.

In closing Dorgan said the Native youth gave him a great sense of hope and that the continued purpose of the CNAY was ‘to continue to find the good news to give us all great hopes for the future.”

Visit www.facebook.com/center4native to access the live-stream in archives.

Click here to read the 2017 State of Native Youth report online.

Click here for a print-friendly version of the report.

The Center for Native American Youth believes Native American youth should lead full and healthy lives, have equal access to opportunity, and draw strength from their culture and one another. CNAY focuses on the resilience of Native youth and supports them through youth recognition, inspiration, and leadership; research, advocacy, and policy change; serving as a national resource exchange; and by developing strengths-based Native youth media opportunities. Learn more at www.cnay.org.

 

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Center For Native American Youth Releases 2nd Annual 'State of Native Youth' Report

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