Sustenance and Subsistence in Bristol Bay

Alaska Natives harvest nature’s bounty in one of the last pure watersheds on Earth

"It’s the hardest work on earth, but I love it," says Chocknok.

Steve Quinn

"It’s the hardest work on earth, but I love it," says Chocknok.

You are trying to access subscriber-only content.

If you are a subscriber, log in here.

If you are not a subscriber, click here to subscribe.

Article Excerpt

Evan Chocknok Sr. favors his right leg while he walks but it doesn’t help much: When the left knee begins to ache, walking hurts. Next, his lower back might begin to flare, but all that must be set aside. On this windy day in early July, it’s time to pull his net—teeming with sockeye and…
Comments

Leave a Reply

You must be logged in to post a comment.

Credit Card Identification Number

This number is recorded as an additional security precaution.

americanexpress

American Express

4 digit, non-embossed number printed above your account number on the front of your card.
visa

Visa

3-digit, non-embossed number printed on the signature panel on the of the card immediately following the card account number.
mastercard

MasterCard

3-digit, non-embossed number printed on the signature panel on the back of the card.

Enter Your Log In Credentials

Send this to friend

Hi,
I thought you might find this interesting:
Sustenance and Subsistence in Bristol Bay

URL: https://indiancountrymedianetwork.com/history/traditional-societies/sustenance-subsistence-bristol-bay/