This photograph was taken in May 1972 at a veterans cemetery in Window Rock, Arizona.

Terry Eiler/Documerica Projec Collection/U.S. National Archives

This photograph was taken in May 1972 at a veterans cemetery in Window Rock, Arizona.

Lest We Forget: A Brief History of Memorial Day

Memorial Day was declared a national holiday after World War I

Today, May 29, is Memorial Day, the day we honor and remember our fallen service members. From the Department of Veterans Affairs Office of Public and Intergovernmental Affairs comes the following brief history of the origins of Memorial Day.

Three years after the Civil War ended, on May 5, 1868, the head of an organization of Union veterans — the Grand Army of the Republic (GAR) — established Decoration Day as a time for the nation to decorate the graves of the war dead with flowers. Maj. Gen. John A. Logan declared that Decoration Day should be observed on May 30. It is believed that date was chosen because flowers would be in bloom all over the country.

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The first large observance was held that year at Arlington National Cemetery, across the Potomac River from Washington, D.C.

(For a timeline on the origins of Memorial Day, created by the U.S. Army Center of Military History, go here.)

The ceremonies centered around the mourning-draped veranda of the Arlington mansion, once the home of Gen. Robert E. Lee. Various Washington officials, including Gen. and Mrs. Ulysses S. Grant, presided over the ceremonies. After speeches, children from the Soldiers’ and Sailors’ Orphan Home and members of the GAR made their way through the cemetery, strewing flowers on both Union and Confederate graves, reciting prayers and singing hymns.

By the end of the 19th century, Memorial Day ceremonies were being held on May 30 throughout the nation. State legislatures passed proclamations designating the day, and the Army and Navy adopted regulations for proper observance at their facilities.

(For a photo gallery of historic photos of Memorial Day observances from the Libray of Congress, click here.)

It was not until after World War I, however, that the day was expanded to honor those who have died in all American wars. In 1971, Memorial Day was declared a national holiday by an act of Congress, though it is still often called Decoration Day. It was then also placed on the last Monday in May.

Gen. Logan’s order for his posts to decorate graves in 1868 “with the choicest flowers of springtime” urged: “We should guard their graves with sacred vigilance. … Let pleasant paths invite the coming and going of reverent visitors and fond mourners. Let no neglect, no ravages of time, testify to the present or to the coming generations that we have forgotten as a people the cost of a free and undivided republic.”

(For President Obama’s 2013 address “Giving thanks to our fallen heroes this Memorial Day,” including video, click here.)

The crowd attending the first Memorial Day ceremony at Arlington National Cemetery was approximately the same size as those that attend today’s observance, about 5,000 people. Then, as now, small American flags were placed on each grave — a tradition followed at many national cemeteries today. In recent years, the custom has grown in many families to decorate the graves of all departed loved ones.

The origins of special services to honor those who die in war can be found in antiquity. The Athenian leader Pericles offered a tribute to the fallen heroes of the Peloponnesian War over 24 centuries ago that could be applied today to the 1.1 million Americans who have died in the nation’s wars: “Not only are they commemorated by columns and inscriptions, but there dwells also an unwritten memorial of them, graven not on stone but in the hearts of men.”

To ensure the sacrifices of America ’s fallen heroes are never forgotten, in December 2000, the U.S. Congress passed and the president signed into law “The National Moment of Remembrance Act,” creating the White House Commission on the National Moment of Remembrance. The commission’s charter is to “encourage the people of the United States to give something back to their country, which provides them so much freedom and opportunity” by encouraging and coordinating commemorations in the United States of Memorial Day and the National Moment of Remembrance.

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Intergenerational Trauma: Understanding Natives’ Inherited Pain

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The National Moment of Remembrance encourages all Americans to pause wherever they are at 3 p.m. local time on Memorial Day for a minute of silence to remember and honor those who have died in service to the nation. As Moment of Remembrance founder Carmella LaSpada states: “It’s a way we can all help put the memorial back in Memorial Day.”

Marines crouch on beach as Japanese landmines knock out a couple of their tanks. Moving Marines keep low to duck sniper fire. One of the tanks burns in the background.

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Lest We Forget: A Brief History of Memorial Day

URL: https://indiancountrymedianetwork.com/news/veterans/lest-we-forget-a-brief-history-of-memorial-day/